5 Tag Results for "pipeline contractor"

5 results displayed (1 - 5):

Kana Pipeline, Inc.

December 23, 2014 | Comments: 0

Pipeline Excavation

So what's the big deal about pipeline construction excavation? Why should we write about it? Well, there's some mathematics to this and it's not as easy as it looks. Moreover, it's downright dangerous if it's not done correctly. According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA®), two workers are killed every month in trench collapses. Fortunately for excavation safety, digging can be done right so it's safe to work in.

An excavation is defined as any man-made cut, cavity, trench or depression in an earth surface formed by earth removal. Specifically, trench excavations are a narrow excavation, in relation to its length, made below the ground surface. Generally, depth is greater than width.

Water and Sewer Pipeline on "Pipeline Excavation"

Kana Pipeline, Inc.

April 23, 2014 | Comments: 0

Pipeline Trenching

Now that we have discussed the different types of soil that OSHA recognizes, let's talk about how to test to determine these different soil types. When preparing trenching activities the three most common methods to test a construction site's soils are: a visual test, a plasticity test, the pocket penetrometer test. Testing soil is an important element in preventing trenches from collapsing.

First, a Visual Test is a purely qualitative evaluation of the condition in and around the entire pipeline construction jobsite. Here one looks at the soil being excavated as well as the soil next to the construction site. If the soil is in clumps, it is cohesive. Otherwise, it may be considered granular it if appears to be course-grained, gravel or sand-like. Signs of vibrations are checked, for i.e. crack-line openings along certain zones that would indicate tension cracks, or any existing utilities that indicate that the soil has been previously disturbed. Also, the exposed sides of the excavations are looked at for any layered geologic structuring. Any stresses, deformations and water intrusion should also be quickly taken into account and remedied accordingly, as these can cause trench failure.

Water and Sewer Pipeline on "Pipeline Trenching"

Kana Pipeline, Inc.

January 31, 2014 | Comments: 0

California Contractors

There is a lot of construction happening in California right now. California highways, such as the famous Interstate 405 "Carmageddon" that began in 2011, and now, just into this New Year "'Jamzilla' is coming," marking the start of another construction shut down on the same highway. Meanwhile, other roads and bridges are being torn down, repaired, widened, or seismically reinforced. Old buildings are being remodeled or demolished altogether for new retail space and new homes are being built by the "tract"-load with developers pushing grand openings for completion by this Spring, known as the busiest time for the house buying market.

2013 marked the start of a pretty good year for us since the recent recession. But to get where we wanted and needed to go, we had to take a good look at our pipeline and determine what needed to change if we were going to get through it.

Water and Sewer Pipeline on "California Contractors"

Kana Pipeline, Inc.

August 30, 2013 | Comments: 0

Pipeline Training

You might be asking yourself, "So how did that pipeline training with Western Water Works and Kana Pipeline Student Apprentices go earlier last month anyway?" July 1st was "Graduation Day" - after two hot, intensive, but fun weeks spent mostly outdoors, at Western Water Works facility in Chino, CA.

Students, including a few from other pipeline construction companies came, joined in and learned the ins and outs of underground pipeline installation - sewer, water pipeline and storm drainage systems, as part of the first ever, "Waterworks 101" pipeline training course.

Water and Sewer Pipeline on "Pipeline Training"

Kana Pipeline, Inc.

April 30, 2013 | Comments: 0

Pipeline Contractor

A good pipeline contractor is hard to come by especially because there is no trade school to become a pipeline project manager or superintendent. The only way to really learn pipeline construction is to work directly for pipeline construction companies. In some cases, there is no formal in-house training offered and new employees simply go out in the field and learn hands-on from their associates. Pipeline contractors may have had decades of field experience, learning the company's culture along the way, to get the basics. However, some things just tend to get missed when lacking formal training.

To solve this problem, Kana Pipeline developed its own in-house pipeline contractor training program for its future Superintendents and Project Managers - those who are directly involved with contract work.

Water and Sewer Pipeline on "Pipeline Contractor"